Heck Yeah, Old Technology!

The Further Adventures of Mork & Mindy
Cracked magazine, August 1979

I apologise that I do not have the first adventure, published June 1979.
For that reason I’ll start here. There’ll be more Cracked stuff later.

Significant about this particular parody is that they used the real show and main character names — yet changed Mork’s leader Orson to Awesome, and Mindy’s grandma’s name to Mrs. Sudson.

I am currently scanning anything involving Robin Williams in my collection of Dynamite, Bananas, MAD, Cracked, and Crazy magazines from the late 1970s to mid-1980s, so be prepared over the next few days for a deluge on Heck Yeah, Old Tech of articles about and parodies of Robin himself, TV’s Mork & Mindy and the movie Popeye.

Shazbot!

I am currently scanning anything involving Robin Williams in my collection of Dynamite, Bananas, MAD, Cracked, and Crazy magazines from the late 1970s to mid-1980s, so be prepared over the next few days for a deluge on Heck Yeah, Old Tech of articles about and parodies of Robin himself, TV’s Mork & Mindy and the movie Popeye.

Shazbot!

fifties-sixties-everyday-life:

1956


I’m told that drinking beer through a straw — and I’m assuming that’s Pabst Blue Ribbon because most of their ads showed the beer in that kind of bowled glass, rather than a standard tapered beer glass — gets you drunk faster. And I think the ladies knew this.
Calendar image by Bill Medcalf for Victor auto gaskets.

fifties-sixties-everyday-life:

1956

I’m told that drinking beer through a straw — and I’m assuming that’s Pabst Blue Ribbon because most of their ads showed the beer in that kind of bowled glass, rather than a standard tapered beer glass — gets you drunk faster. And I think the ladies knew this.

Calendar image by Bill Medcalf for Victor auto gaskets.

drmonkeysetroscans:

Urgent phone calls.

To avoid drilling holes through the walls or getting into the crawlspace, Tincan Bell ran the phone lines through the air conditioning ducts and, for the Arizona room’s phone, the drier vent.

Laundry bluing was a precursor to today’s brighteners in detergent; the blue would offset the color yellow on one’s whites. So in the context of this ad, where a sorority is making their dainty underthings whiter by rinsing out whatever would turn their drawers yellow… 

College must have been a real nail-biter for them.

Laundry bluing was a precursor to today’s brighteners in detergent; the blue would offset the color yellow on one’s whites. So in the context of this ad, where a sorority is making their dainty underthings whiter by rinsing out whatever would turn their drawers yellow…

College must have been a real nail-biter for them.

Elsie the cow and her first two children (Beauregard in the park, Buelah in the kitchen) promoting Borden’s milk products. There was no ad for Elmer’s Glue in this issue or it’d be a full-family trifecta.

Dear Mrs. McKenzie:
We didn’t write this magazine for you, we wrote it for the gentleman of the house. Your husband does not sympathise with your sentiments, I assure you, because most men DO like the girls as we show them. Two letters from this one is a testimonial. Surely you realize it’s not just our burley adventure stories your hubby pays two-bits every month for. If he saw you in the “various stages of undress” we put our models in (they’re never obscene, we would be in trouble if we did that) maybe he wouldn’t be browsing our magazine. Or perhaps he would and it’s more than your attitude that is disagreeable to him, but we’re not ones to throw stones. Food for thought. 
In short, thank you for your opinion and please go suck an egg.Editor, Saga Magazine - True Adventures For Men
 
 (This reply is fiction by me, not Saga's response since they published the letter in October 1956 without commentary. The woman above the letter is from the testimonial mentioned, as proof that there was nothing smutty whatsoever about their monthly models.)

Dear Mrs. McKenzie:
We didn’t write this magazine for you, we wrote it for the gentleman of the house. Your husband does not sympathise with your sentiments, I assure you, because most men DO like the girls as we show them. Two letters from this one is a testimonial. Surely you realize it’s not just our burley adventure stories your hubby pays two-bits every month for. If he saw you in the “various stages of undress” we put our models in (they’re never obscene, we would be in trouble if we did that) maybe he wouldn’t be browsing our magazine. Or perhaps he would and it’s more than your attitude that is disagreeable to him, but we’re not ones to throw stones. Food for thought.
In short, thank you for your opinion and please go suck an egg.
Editor, Saga Magazine - True Adventures For Men

 
 
(This reply is fiction by me, not Saga's response since they published the letter in October 1956 without commentary. The woman above the letter is from the testimonial mentioned, as proof that there was nothing smutty whatsoever about their monthly models.)

Bone-Dry Shoe was a work footwear maker in Tacoma WA from 1919 until 1960. Above are a 1944 newspaper advertisement, a shoebox found in an antique store a couple blocks from Bone-Dry’s headquarters, and a photo taken a few years ago of the headquarters near 20th & Pacific in Tacoma (the building is now owned by an architecture firm) — the store address in the ad is now occupied by a fountain that’s beside the local bus system’s headquarters/main terminus.

The “Star Trek: Strategic Operations Simulator” overlay for the stock Atari 2600 joystick. I’ve never seen one since it wasn’t necessary for gameplay and half the people who played the game weren’t using stock Atari sticks.

The “Star Trek: Strategic Operations Simulator” overlay for the stock Atari 2600 joystick. I’ve never seen one since it wasn’t necessary for gameplay and half the people who played the game weren’t using stock Atari sticks.

jagged-fragments:

It was a slow cop day, June 28 of 1944.  
And the one person they had in jail didn’t commit a crime.

jagged-fragments:

It was a slow cop day, June 28 of 1944.
And the one person they had in jail didn’t commit a crime.