Heck Yeah, Old Technology!
jagged-fragments:

Just what she always wanted!

1957, The Tattler and Bystander magazine.

jagged-fragments:

Just what she always wanted!

1957, The Tattler and Bystander magazine.

Spry shortening was introduced in 1936 and was discontinued in the 1970s, and their spokesperson was Aunt Jenny. But there was more than one Aunt Jenny, it turns out. The one everyone knows, the older lady in the lower image, replaced a younger one who likely (similar to Betty Crocker) never existed and was only a drawing.

Recently I found this 1953 cookbook at an estate sale for 50¢ (you can own one too for more) and that’s the first thing I noticed, Aunt Jenny’s youth.

Here are a couple other pages about her hijinx:
• Thriftshop Romantic’s The Spryford Wives, and
Lileks' Gallery of Regrettable Food's Aunt Jenny’s Real-Life Stories.

Three things we don’t do anymore:
— Scrapbook our announcements and invitations.
— Send formal printed invitations to our tea parties.
— Have name cards printed (which are not business cards).

You’ll want to read these cards full-size.

Three things we don’t do anymore:
— Scrapbook our announcements and invitations.
— Send formal printed invitations to our tea parties.
— Have name cards printed (which are not business cards).

You’ll want to read these cards full-size.

Okay, team, I’m back from my trip to the Packwood (WA) citywide fleamarket, and have taken about a hundred photos of cool vintage and antique stuff. And the occasional “what the…?!” lifeform.  Expect something other than old ads in the near future, though you’re not exempt from them because I did buy three magazines (Popular Mechanics 1967, Movies 1945, and Holiday 1946) and eight photos (1900 to 1960) also.

above: Uncertain model of totally thrashed Royal manual typewriter, 1940s to 1950s, and I believe they were asking fifty cents. Some typewriter repair-person needing spare parts, steampunk, or key-cutter should upcycle it before it hits a dumpster’s bottom with a fourty-pound *thunk*.

Okay, team, I’m back from my trip to the Packwood (WA) citywide fleamarket, and have taken about a hundred photos of cool vintage and antique stuff. And the occasional “what the…?!” lifeform. Expect something other than old ads in the near future, though you’re not exempt from them because I did buy three magazines (Popular Mechanics 1967, Movies 1945, and Holiday 1946) and eight photos (1900 to 1960) also.

above: Uncertain model of totally thrashed Royal manual typewriter, 1940s to 1950s, and I believe they were asking fifty cents. Some typewriter repair-person needing spare parts, steampunk, or key-cutter should upcycle it before it hits a dumpster’s bottom with a fourty-pound *thunk*.

Polaroid 350 and 360 ads, 1969

jagged-fragments:

Looked up just in time to see this going across my windowsill: the swivel-necked acetate glitter-fawn. So glad it’s not a spider or an ant for once.  But who bells a deer like a cat? Does this species sneak up on grasses?

jagged-fragments:

Looked up just in time to see this going across my windowsill: the swivel-necked acetate glitter-fawn. So glad it’s not a spider or an ant for once. But who bells a deer like a cat? Does this species sneak up on grasses?

Plastic pinback badge, three-dimensional of Mt Rainier behind a daffodil, for what used to be called the Western Washington Fair for over a hundred years, until recently when it became part of the state fair system and is now the Washington State Fair.  Do The Puyallup! (Coming up next week: Sept 5-21)

Plastic pinback badge, three-dimensional of Mt Rainier behind a daffodil, for what used to be called the Western Washington Fair for over a hundred years, until recently when it became part of the state fair system and is now the Washington State Fair.
Do The Puyallup! (Coming up next week: Sept 5-21)

elizabethplaid:

weirdvintage:

Rainbow. Poke Cake.  You can’t make this up.  1978 (via Found in Mom’s Basement)

A delicious way to come out to your family?

Poke cakes used to be the thing. It was like the next evolutionary and entertainment step beyond the “7-Up cake”.

elizabethplaid:

weirdvintage:

Rainbow. Poke Cake.  You can’t make this up.  1978 (via Found in Mom’s Basement)

A delicious way to come out to your family?

Poke cakes used to be the thing. It was like the next evolutionary and entertainment step beyond the “7-Up cake”.

Native American appropriation & stereotypes in advertising culture:
1950 (sheets), 1962 (fencing, insurance), and 1920 (laxative).

Correct me if I’m wrong, but those kids are too young to be using the toilet and, if they’re not in diapers, they use a little potty. So how can they be so damned opinionated about pot-seats then? 1962